Forums  /  Talk  /  [Resource] A better way to retime speedruns
  SlushPuppySlushPuppy

I've noticed that it's very time consuming to perfectly retime a speedrun: you have to download the video, open it in a video editing software, then manually calculate the difference between the first and last frame.

That's why I decided to make a program that does the hard work for you, so all you need to do is paste in information from the right click menu of YouTube's video player.

Here it is: https://github.com/Slush0Puppy/retime
All of the instructions are included in the readme file.

Please leave any feedback so I can continue to improve this project.

OxkniferOxknifer likes this. 
  CoolHandMikeCoolHandMike

Does this have functionality that LiveSplit does not?

 
  KomradeKomrade

You mean like retiming runs down to the frame eliminating the h u m a n e l e m e n t ?

ImaproshamanImaproshaman likes this. 
  SlushPuppySlushPuppy

@theripper999 I'm guessing you didn't read the whole post, or even the title. This is not a timer, it's for people (especially moderators) to retime runs.

 
  LivLiv

How exactly does this work? Like the process itself? I assume it's just taking two time stamps and calculating the total frames in the video? I'd download it and test it, but Mediafire has always been an ad-infested/redirect mess for me, even with adblockers, so I'll pass.

The only thing to really be aware of is proper, accurate re-timing is done in most cases via a program called Handbrake and locking your video itself to a specific framerate and then re-timing. For example, some games will run at 29.97 fps or some will run at framerates over 60fps, like SMB1, so taking flat 30/60 fps values from Youtube (since most people will record at a flat 30/60 and even then I'm not sure if Youtube will hold 29.97 recordings as 29.97, but someone can speak up on that if they know) and calculating time based on those isn't fully accurate.

Alternatively, you can time it yourself by recording at the exact framerate, retiming it in an editing program and potentially handing that uncompressed RAW over to a mod to fully verify with it being unaffected by Youtubes or Twitch's compression. This is why most games don't dabble in milliseconds, or it's a top 10 only type thing.

ImaproshamanImaproshaman likes this. 
  SlushPuppySlushPuppy

Yes, that's the rough gist of how it works. I'll upload it to github at some point to make downloading safer and easier.

The problem with those methods you mentioned is that they require downloading the video (which takes longer and requires storage), hence why boards tend to avoid milliseconds in the way you stated. This program will give an accurate result without the need for that. I don't see how any compression on YouTube could seriously affect the timing any more than a recording.

 
  LivLiv

I meant because if you record a run at say 60.0988 (or whatever SMB1's framerate is) or 29.97 or 59.94 and upload it to Youtube, it could affect the framerate it is outputted at on the platform. I don't know the specifics behind how Youtube handles framerate, but I imagine they'd potentially just lock the framerate to a flat 25, 30 or 60fps, which would obviously produce a differing amount of frames.

 
  dadinfinitumdadinfinitum

This is really neat. I went ahead and wrote a version that is JavaScript-based and works online, so you don't have to download anything and works on any operating system. My source code is linked on the site, too.

http://slashinfty.github.io/yt-frame-timer/

OxkniferOxknifer, ImaproshamanImaproshaman and 2 others like this. 
  SlushPuppySlushPuppy

@Chimpaneez That one is inaccurate because it doesn't take the framerate into consideration.
Also, using Vegas requires having the video downloaded, which takes longer than using this program.

 
  dadinfinitumdadinfinitum

My version and Slush Puppy's versions should be identical. Glad to see they are in practice by other users.

ImaproshamanImaproshaman likes this.